Lollaland Blog - lollaland

This year, Lollaland has partnered with Raising a Reader to promote the development, practice, and maintenance of home literacy routines. At Lollaland, we are all about routines as well, and we do our best to encourage routines around family mealtime. Lollaland is excited to be donating 15% of our profits from any of our mealtime pieces to Raising a Reader, so please consider bringing our microwaveable, US-made plates, bowls, and dipping cups into your home and supporting children's literacy!


As millions of children across the U.S. end their summer vacations and head back to school, parents are getting ready to ease their kids back into the school-year routine of homework, extracurricular activities and going to bed at a reasonable hour. Raising A Reader, a national nonprofit organization that provides resources and guidance for families to implement home-based literacy routines, suggests as part of that routine, parents work in regular time to share books with their children above-and-beyond their required schoolwork.

Research shows that the time caring adults spend sharing books with children has a direct relationship on their academic success. Whether building background knowledge and vocabulary, comprehension skills, social and communication skills or reinforcing the idea that reading is not just something associated with school, home book-sharing routines are essential to childrens’ success.

“During the school year, many families become so consumed with schoolwork that the habit of sharing books for pleasure seems like an unnecessary distraction,” said Gabrielle Miller, Ed.D., president and CEO of Raising A Reader. “Parents need to remember it is more important than ever to find a few minutes each day to keep the reading habit alive. Aside from the innumerable cognitive, academic and social benefits, children begin to understand that reading for pleasure actually helps improve their success in school and in life.

Here are some tips for parents to make reading a larger part of the school year:

  • Talk with your child about his or her interests, watch what he/she is drawn to and help find books about those subjects. If your child in interested in horses, for example, find fiction books that tell exciting stories about horses and nonfiction books that will provide interesting facts and information your child might enjoy. Just because a child does not like to read fiction does not mean he/she isn’t a reader.
  • Look for opportunities to connect reading with what your child is learning in school. Help them make connections they might not otherwise see. Stories about sharing, caring and giving relate to the math he/she may be learning or folk stories from other countries can help deepen understanding of geography. Doing this will not only encourage a continued interest in books but also can inspire your child to take more of an interest in subjects he or she is studying.
  • Make sure to allow your child to still have free time to do whatever they want to do. It’s important reading not be viewed as more homework or punishment.
  • Ask your child’s teachers about books they recommend and develop a suggested reading list for the school year. Oftentimes teachers can suggest books their students have enjoyed in the past and these recommendations can mean the difference between your child embracing reading or viewing it as a chore. Find out wat books other kids have enjoyed.
  • Challenge yourself to find opportunities to share books with children that don’t make hectic schedules even worse. Traveling on public transportation offers a great opportunity. Reading while cooking dinner (recipe books are great) or a few minutes at the end of a meal before everyone runs off. Set the DVR to tape family TV shows and spend some time together sharing a book instead.

Raising A Reader is a 501c3 charitable organization dedicated to helping families develop, practice and maintain literacy habits for children ages 0-8 that are critical for a child’s success in school and in life. The program is evidence-based, with more than 32 independent evaluations showing that Raising A Reader significantly improves language and literacy skills, cognitive development, communication and comprehension skills, school readiness and social competence. Raising A Reader is implemented through a network of community partners that comprise more than 2,500 locations across the country including public school systems, libraries, afterschool programs, community agencies and other organizations both public and private. Headquartered in Redwood City, California, Raising A Reader was founded in 1999 and has served more than 1.25 million families nationwide. More information is available at RaisingAReader.org, @RARnational (Twitter) and RaisingAReaderNational (Facebook).

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Don't Let Reading Get Lost During Summer Fun!

Posted on July 26, 2016 by Hanna Lim

DON’T LET READING GET LOST DURING SUMMER FUN! EXPERTS STRESS THE IMPORTANCE OF REGULAR READING TIME DURING THE SUMMER

Tips for parents to get kids into regular summer reading routine

Summer is a time for beaches, swimming, camp, vacations and all kinds of outdoor activities. Unfortunately, many children will stop reading while having all this fun in the sun and experts say parents need to make sharing books a part of summer vacation and establish regular reading routines for their children. Lollaland is working with Raising A Reader, a national nonprofit organization that provides resources and guidance for families to implement home-based literacy routines, to support children’s literacy and raise awareness of the importance of reading.  “Summer reading should be all about the parent-child experience,” said Gabrielle Miller, Ed.D., president and CEO of Raising A Reader. “Rather than having it be a chore, or a list of must-read books, summer is a terrific opportunity to build family reading experiences. Whether it’s as simple as reading with children so they can see how much adults love reading, or visiting places and doing activities tied to a book, there are a host of ways reading can help children enjoy the summer and be ready to start school in the fall.”

Here are some of the Raising A Reader summer reading tips for parents: 

  • Reading often gets lost in the shuffle of summer activities such as camp, sports and vacation travel. Schedule a regular time to share books with your child and establish a regular routine to ensure reading doesn’t become a low priority and has the same importance as other activities.
  • It’s OK to let your child read e-books if he or she is comfortable using a tablet, but remember, whether it’s an e-book or a print book -- especially for young children -- the most important thing is to spend time together sharing the book. It’s about the experience, not the technology.
  • Make it fun. Have your child come up with a different ending to a story, play ‘what if’ with the characters or the setting, or read the book from end to beginning. Come up with fun ways to engage your child beyond the actual reading of the book.
  • Create an outdoor reading area so the whole family can enjoy the summer weather and not feel stuck inside. Children generally read indoors, so being outdoors will create a new environment for enjoying a book and boost a child’s enthusiasm for reading.
  • Invite the family pet to join the book sharing experience. Even if your child can’t read yet, have her ‘read’ the story to you and the pet. Children who can read will be able to practice their skills and children who have not yet learned to read will begin to think of themselves as ‘readers’ which is very important to lifelong learning.
  • If you are taking your kids somewhere for the day, such as a pool, the beach, a picnic or the zoo, pack a book to share and have a reading break or two during day. After an hour or so in the water, your child may enjoy 30 minutes of reading on a comfortable chair or even floating on a raft.

Even though babies don’t know how to read words yet, there are still plenty of things that they can do with books that will help them grow up to be strong readers and book lovers.

  • Get your babies use to holding and playing with a book. If you’re reading with an infant, it’s OK to let them “chew” or “munch” on a story. Board books and bath books are the best for this because they can withstand baby drool!
  • Help babies understand that books have pages by letting them just flip through the book. Show babies that the pages of a book flip from left to right.
  • Take this time to point out what is on each page. Help them build word banks in their brain by telling them what the different pictures are. Talk about the colors, count objects and if you’re looking at a touch and feel book, talk about textures.
  • Use books to build motor skills. Instead of a toy, place a book in front of your baby during tummy time and encourage them to grab it.
  • As babies become older and are able to look at a page for more than a few seconds, start talking about the story.
  • You don’t have to focus so much on reading the actual words on the page. Just describe what’s happening in the pictures. Make it fun!
  • Help your baby make connections between what they see in the pictures and something that they experience in their own life. If your family owns a pet dog and you happen to read a book that has a picture of a dog, help your child make that connection.
  • Use books to get a baby’s attention during activities like bath time and diaper changes. It really helps!
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If you've followed our blog at all, you know we do an annual post about autism for 2 reasons: my first job out of college involved working as a teacher at the New England Center for Children, a school for children with autism, and now that I'm a parent, I've seen, first-hand, the prevalence of autism, so I'm passionate about increasing awareness.

For this post, we reached out to a friend whose daughter has autism, asking if he'd be willing to share about the following: When did you first suspect that Zoe had Autism?  What did you do?  What are your favorite activities that you and Zoe enjoy?

Eric - Thank you for sharing so candidly. 

"20 months went by, and it all felt normal. Zoe and I were thick as thieves and I loved spoiling her. I couldn't help myself. She loved swings, she loved being held by daddy and boy did she like to eat (daddy's girl for sure!) We thought everything was fine...I think about it constantly, did I miss the signs earlier? I don't know...but it still haunts me as early intervention is crucial with young kids on the spectrum. As the months went by we started noticing a couple of things leading up to her 2nd birthday that started to concern us. Anytime she would pick up a new word or skill, she would lose something she already knew. She was a bit slow in walking and when she did start to walk she would walk on her toes. She seemed to fixate on certain objects...I think my wife and I both had read enough about autism that we were starting to see some red flags. We decided to take her to a developmental pediatrician...I think we both hoped that the doctor would call us paranoid and tell us we were imagining things...that's not how things worked out. "Your daughter is on the spectrum of autism..." It felt like a vacuum had sucked all the air out of the world. It was devastating. My flashes forward on that day were darker and in a quiet moment alone I cried until there were no more tears. Would there be a father-daughter dance now, how do I protect her from this, she does not deserve this...I was sad, I was angry, but most of all I was afraid. Afraid is the unknown, afraid I would never get to know the girl inside of Zoe, afraid autism would take her away from me."January 23, 2011, in the middle of one of the biggest snowstorms NYC had ever seen, I held in my arms the most beautiful thing I had ever laid eyes on, my daughter, Zoe. It was love at first sight. I was smitten and I was never going to let her go. It's weird, I distinctly remember sitting in that hospital room with this little nugget beside me, flashing forward to her wedding day and wondering what our father-daughter dance would be like, and how bittersweet it would be for me. Less than 24 hours in the world and I was already feeling territorial haha.

There was a short grieving process and then Heidi and I went to work. We weren't going to let this diagnosis take her away from us. We went about getting Zoe all the tools she would need to reach her full potential. We secured district support to enroll Zoe at REED Academy, we hired speech therapists and private ABA therapists. We threw all our resources at trying to improve Zoe's quality of life. She's sharp as tacks...she just learns differently and she has to fight through a cacophony of sensory input that I will never fully grasp just to simply focus. I'll never truly understand her struggle, but she is a fighter and she comes from a family of fighters and we are making progress thanks to hard work dedication and a strong support system of friends and the folks at REED.

Zoe is 5 now...she's the same kid really. Happy disposition, loves a good adrenaline rush, loves to eat. We love to be outside together, love to sneak cupcakes and ice cream when we are not supposed to but mostly we love to just be together. We are inseparable. We have a special connection...and while she may not say the words all the time, she doesn't need to. She loves her daddy and daddy will always love her to the moon and back." - Eric Chung

This year, Eric is trying to raise $20,000 for the Go the Distance for Autism charity ride. He will be doing 25 miles. Please consider joining Team Zoe as a rider or a "virtual rider" by clicking this link http://www.gtd4autism.org/team/jointeamzoe and help Eric [and Zoe] reach their goal! Note that corporate matching went a long way last year, so please take advantage should that option exist for you. Just click the SUPPORT ME button.  

As an extra incentive, Lollaland will be randomly selecting 1 donor to win a Lollaland Play Mat + Lollacup ($175 value). You will automatically be entered to win simply by donating ANY amount. Thanks, in advance.

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Beyond the Tank - Where are we now?

Posted on January 14, 2016 by Hanna Lim

Thanks for tuning in and watching what has happened, with our business and our lives, since we were first on Shark Tank in 2012. As you saw in the episode, we met with one of our investors, Robert Herjavec, in January, 2015, and filmed for Beyond the Tank one year ago. A lot can happen and has happened in one year…

  • We launched our glass baby bottles and are officially in-store with those.
  • My skin is even better than when we filmed. I know it sounds crazy, but I’ve been off topical steroids for almost three years now, and though it was a long, hard journey, my skin is healing and it is so liberating not having to revolve my life around rashes on my skin, pain, itchiness, embarrassment, constant visits to the dermatologist, and obsessing over lotions, creams, and medication. You can learn more about Red Skin Syndrome, Topical Steroid Addiction, and my Topical Steroid Withdrawal by watching our interview with Dr. Marvin Rapaport.
  • Another exciting thing that happened in the past year is we launched another new product, the Lollaland Play Mat! I’ll be sharing more about that in the coming days, but this is a very exciting product launch for us, because our family is obsessed with this play mat, not only the way it looks, but the role it plays in the home of little ones.

Robert Herjavec and the LollaFamilyThat’s the good news, but it’s not all rosy. Running a small business is hard work, and everything feels very tenuous! I hate to admit that Mark and I are often filled with fear and self-doubt. Should we spend more money and resources to launch another new product or do we stay the course and let it happen more organically? Who is our next hire? What can we be doing better? We open a new account and get that sale, but we are constantly reminding ourselves that nothing lasts forever. As a working mom, I often feel burned out and overwhelmed, but I am blessed with friends, family, and a business that motivate me to power through the rough patches. One thing I can never take for granted is that I absolutely LOVE what I do. Work makes me happy and is fulfilling in so many ways.

In closing, we just want to say a HUGE thank you to our friends, family, colleagues, customers, and retailers. Thank you also to the people behind Shark Tank and Beyond the Tank for the numerous opportunities. It all began with a casting call in 2011, and here we are in 2016 – still in business and growing! Without the relentless support of so many people, none of this would exist, so we appreciate all of you in the biggest way!

 

 

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Lessons from our "Shark," Mark Cuban

Posted on October 09, 2015 by Hanna Lim

Classic. I fly from Southern California to Dallas, Texas for 24 hours to see Mark Cuban deliver a keynote address at a “Women in Toy” event on Monday 10/5, and I have NO memory left on my phone – couldn’t even snap one photo. I had to ask a colleague to take a photo of Mark and me and text it to me, and while Mark was saying some amazing things, I literally couldn’t record any of it. SO frustrating to say the least, but I took copious notes, and I’m making it up to myself by sharing it with you.

As many of you know, Mark Cuban, is truly a self-made billionaire. He has incredible business acumen and an indescribable tenacity that is simply inspiring to entrepreneurs like me and my husband, Mark. I am still a bit star-struck by Mark Cuban, even though he owns part of Lollaland. Mark [Cuban] has always been passionate about playing [and watching] basketball. He never made it to the NBA, but guess what? He bought an NBA team instead (Go Mavs! #MFFL). I can’t help but think of this as the ultimate example of persistence and thinking outside the box.

For those of you who couldn’t be at the event, here are the main takeaways, from Mark Cuban’s keynote address – read them slowly and carefully.

  1. Sell, sell, sell, and then go sell some more, and when you’re done, go sell some more. Without sales, you do not have a business.
  2. Be curious, consume all the information you can, and don’t stop learning.
  3. Use your core competency, and delegate the rest. Mark has created a team of talented folks who support Shark Tank entrepreneurs with jobs like accounting, graphic design, and web design so that the entrepreneurs can do more of what they do best.
  4. Do the work! You can only imagine how many questions Mark gets asked. It drives Mark crazy when people ask him questions that frankly could’ve been answered with a little time and effort spent searching the internet.
  5. Be self-aware. Some businesses are completely broken, but the entrepreneur doesn’t even know or recognize it. Take a good look at yourself and your business and be able to recognize the truth.
  6. Don’t pivot. An entrepreneur in the audience asked the question, “I have a product that’s not exactly a homerun, at what point should I pivot and change directions?” Mark pointed out that if you’re having to pivot, you don’t believe in your product anymore.
  7. Be nice. People often mistake tenacity for being mean/aggressive, but sometimes a little kindness can create some surprising new opportunities.

Mark Cuban closed the keynote address with this, and I will end with it as well: “The American Dream is alive and well.” Take these tips and may it help your business, and personal life, prosper. 

 

Back-to-School is always an exciting time for so many reasons, but in all honesty, the one thing I dread about the kids going back to school is packing lunches.  I know it shouldn't be THAT difficult, but sometimes I'm just out of ideas, and I'm tired of making the same things. 

All three of my girls have a milk protein allergy (that they're starting to grow out of, thankfully), so I've been packing dairy-free lunches for the past 7 years now.  Aside from leftovers, these are my go-to school lunches.  My kids love hot meals, so I just heat these up, throw them into a thermos in the morning, and they're good to go.

  • pasta (spaghetti or pasta with pancetta and peas)
  • fried rice (see Gywneth Paltrow's recipe or my super easy version below)
  • chicken nuggets
  • chicken burritos
  • chicken noodle soup
  • "sushi" - avocado slices and rice in nori (seaweed)
  • teriyaki chicken with rice and broccoli
  • sandwiches/wraps: sunflower seed butter + jam OR ham + avocado OR hummus + cumcumber

Along with these "entrees," I always pack a side of fruit for something sweet + extra nutrients.  I wanted to share a quick and easy way to make fried rice that makes for a [relatively] healthy meal.  I love making this when I have leftover rice from Chinese food take-out.  

Super Easy Fried Rice:

  1. Heat a large fry pan and add cubed pancetta/cubed hot dogs/whatever meat you want.  You can also omit the meat.  Cook until browned.
  2. Chop half a small onion and saute.
  3. Add frozen vegetables and saute for a couple minutes until heated through.
  4. Add cooked rice
  5. Season with soy sauce.  If the fried rice starts to look too dark, you can season with salt too.
  6. Add a sprinkle of sesame seed oil and sesame seeds (if you want)

What are your go-to school lunches?  

To kick off the back-to-school season, Lollaland has partnered with Luca & Company and SoYoung for a Back-to-School Lunch Instagram Giveaway valued at $275.  

To enter, visit Lollaland's Instagram @lollalandusa and good luck!   Both Luca & Company and SoYoung's booths were near the Lollaland Booth at a tradeshow last year.  These two companies really caught my attention.  The FunPod by Luca & Company has been a God-send ever since I got one.  Here's how we use our FunPod in the LollaHome.  Oddly enough, my 2-year-old loves to just sit in it and play peek-a-boo, so not only is it functional, but it can make for fun times, as well.  As for SoYoung goods - just take a quick look and you'll see why theyr'e so unique and chic!  I LOVE their designs and aesthetic.   

            

 

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When [Freak] Accidents Happen

Posted on July 29, 2015 by Hanna Lim

I'm not sure if you heard the news, but "a 75-foot-tall, 75-year-old pine crashed without warning at around 5 p.m. just outside the Kidspace Children's Museum and fell onto kids at a summer day camp Tuesday, injuring eight children, two of them critically, fire officials said." (http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/including-children-hurt-falling-tree-kids-museum-32745551)  

Well, my two daughters (ages 6 and 7) were attending that camp and apparently standing less than 20 feet away from the tree when it fell.  When I arrived on the scene I was immediately notified that camp was being held directly under and near the tree when it fell.  The staff notified each parent whether his/her child(ren) was safe, and the police kept us all well-informed and calm as we waiting over an hour for our children to be released back to us. My girls are safe and unscathed, but my eldest was sobbing before bed as she shared with us that she saw her friend, Joy, get hit by the tree and go to the hospital.  I believe Joy's still in critical condition, so our thoughts and prayers are with the families of all the children who were injured.  

I am so thankful to the camp counselors and Kidspace Museum staff for keeping our children safe and in good spirits.  Thank you, also, Pasadena Police and Pasadena Fire Departments for your incredibly fast response.  You were all absolute rockstars.  

This was such a harrowing experience.  At least 1 firetruck and 1 ambulance passed me on my way to pick my girls up yesterday, but I thought nothing of it, until I pulled up to the scene.  I teach my children to say no to strangers, look both ways before crossing the street, but what can prepare them for freak accidents like these?  Nothing, really.  I guess it's all about how we choose to deal with the aftermath.  

Please say a prayer for all the children and families involved, and take a moment to peruse the resources listed below.  Finally, let this be another reminder to cherish each and every moment and live life to its fullest.  

The school psychologist at my children's school, Dr. Tina Bryson, suggests the following resources and steps to guide parents in talking with their children about the incident.

Helpful books/videos:

  • Verbal First Aid and The Worst is Over by Prager and Acosta
  • Trauma-Proofing our Kids by Dr. Peter Levine
  • Below find the link to a video with a few practical ideas from the book Verbal First Aid:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJp4Lrjs6qg

Steps to guide parents in talking with their children:

  • Soothe and comfort—non-verbal touch and holding as well as assuring words “The worst is over.  You are safe.”  
    • sometimes returning to things that settled your child when he/she was younger are good to pull back into your routine—a song you would sing to them or an old bedtime ritual can be comforting and help them feel safe
    • parents may need some additional self-care or support to be able to be a calm, assuring presence to their children since these experiences can be secondarily traumatizing to parents as well
  • Acting out behavior or heightened sensitivity or reactivity is to be expected for some children.  Consider these signs that they may need soothing, connected time with parents, slowing things down with lots of connection in order to soothe their little nervous systems.  
  • Name it to Tame it.  This is a technique in Dr. Tina Bryson's book The Whole-Brain Child, where we help children tell their stories about something scary.  When we help our children tell their story, the story should have the facts as the child remembers them, the emotions the child felt and feels, and a message of safety and resilience “There were lots of people who came to help.”  “You are safe.”  etc.
  • The most important thing is to help them feel safe and to assure them that you will listen, answer questions, and keep them safe.  Follow their lead on the questions and telling the story.
  • Help them find a way to do something active.  Draw a picture for someone who helped them, for someone else who was hurt, etc.  Give them a job that allows them to “help”.
  • Seek out professional help if your child’s distress begins to impact their appetite, sleep, or if their emotions begin to become overwhelmingly intense with feelings of depression or anxiety or panic.
  • Keep in mind that terrifying experiences are not always traumatizing.  There are many factors that contribute to whether or not a child is traumatized, but it’s important that parents don’t project their own trauma and that kids don’t hear their parents talking about “trauma”.  Pay attention to how your own child is experiencing the event.

 

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Beat summer boredom - "Mom/Dad Camp" to the rescue!

Posted on June 25, 2015 by Hanna Lim

A friend of mine brought up the idea of organizing a "Parent Camp," and it was such a great idea that I just had to share. Summer camps seem to cost a fortune, and personally, I've had to piece together several different camps so that I can be at work. Even if you're a stay-at-home parent, this could be a welcome a break/change-of-pace for your kids. Here's a great, low-cost option - Parent Camp.

 Summer Fun

Summer Fun

This will take a bit of planning, but one parent would watch ALL the children for a day. It sounds daunting, but I find that kids sometimes do better in groups. Hours can be negotiated but our group was planning on doing 9-3.  The parent in charge is in charge of keeping the kids "entertained" and safe, feeding them snacks, providing a lunch which can be pizza delivery, sandwiches, pasta (whatever the parent in charge can manage).

Suggested activities:

(it's likely that the kids will want to just play with one another, but if you want to plan some things, here are some ideas)

  • walk to a park / hike around the neighborhood
  • water play in the backyard/water ballon fights
  • arts & crafts
  • cooking project
  • "stations" - art, board games, something educational, ipad, etc.
  • neighborhood "scavenger hunt"

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Lollaland's New Website is Live!

Posted on April 24, 2015 by Hanna Lim

Growth Hacking? Adwords? Responsive? WHAT? I taught high school chemistry, became a mom, had an idea for a straw sippy cup and started a company. Creating effective websites is not my forte. When we had our first website built in 2010, we focused a lot on branding, but times have changed and in a matter of 5 years, our website became totally obsolete. We knew we had to make changes.

Long story short, we got the new site up and running in record time. Luckily, we had just completed an amazing photo shoot the month before, and we put together an aggressive, hard-working team to execute everything.

Last night, we did something as a company, that we don't do enough anymore. When Mark and I first started Lollacup, every account we opened, every milestone we accomplished we "celebrated." Never in a big way, but it could be as little as a high five and as extravagant as a Baskin Robbins ice cream cone. Well, as our business grew and we had more and more struggles, celebrating went by the wayside.

Last night, to celebrate the launch of our new website (among other major accomplishments), we went out to dinner as a team.  We had Korean BBQ, and it was so great to have non-work conversations with the people we work with everyday.

Lollaland celebrates over Korean BBQ

Lollaland celebrates over Korean BBQ

Thank you to the following people who helped make lollaland.com happen:

Caroline Tran - Photography

Avalon, Decker, Marra, Shia - Models

Chad Riddersen - Digital Marketing Consultant / Growth Hacker

Vince Roco - Project Manager

We hope you'll take a look at the new website, and while you’re perusing it, please consider that April is Autism awareness month, so Lollaland will be donating 25% of all sales from today through the end of April, 2015 to Team Zoe. My first job out of college was at the New England Center for Children, a school for autism, located in the Boston area.  Although I did not ultimately pursue a career in the field of autism, my year teaching at the NECC made a huge impression on me, and I'd love to do my part in increasing autism awareness.

With love,

Hanna Lim

First, congratulations. You’ve taken an idea to market, built distribution, and I’m excited to see how you and NeatCheeks fare in the infamous Shark Tank tonight!

NeatCheeks in the infamous Shark Tank

NeatCheeks in the infamous Shark Tank

I know it’s been a while since we last talked in October, but it’s been exciting to watch your company grow, and now - Shark Tank! I was so humbled when you, fellow mompreneurs, reached out to me for advice, and there was so much to talk about. We have so much in common: we all have three children, we’re working moms, and all small businesses inherently share similar struggles.

Thank you for sending me a few samples of NeatCheeks. I tried them for the first time on my feisty two-year-old this week. She’s two so she eats independently, but it’s never neat. She is the third of three girls, so admittedly, she is a spoiled brat. I simply have not had the energy to set boundaries like I did with my older two. Anyway, she always throws a fit as I wipe her filthy face after meals, and I just power through the process because I know she’ll get over it one day. Before I cleaned her face with NeatCheeks, I showed her the little package (which is the perfect size, by the way), and told her it was a yummy wipe. She was instantly intrigued, and it worked like a charm! I even caught my six-year-old licking a NeatCheek wipe!

I’m really excited to see what the future has in store for NeatCheeks.  Whatever the outcome of your negotiations in the Shark Tank may be, I know this will mean big things for you.  Cheers to years and years of success.

Hanna Lim (Lollaland)

AND, for all you parents or Shark Tank fans out there, Lollaland and NeatCheeks are hosting a GIVEAWAY.  We are giving away a Lollacup + a Lollaland Mealtime Set + NeatCheeks wipes to try in honor of NeatCheeks' appearance on Shark Tank tonight.  To enter the GIVEAWAY, please leave a comment (any comment) on this blog post, and we will randomly select 1 winner on Friday, April 24, 2015.

AND, for all you fellow entrepreneurs out there, we always love to network and learn from others, so please feel free to comment here or reach out to us in Lollaland!

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